Non jewish girl dating a jewish guy

On the flip side, having them visit a Holocaust museum will also likely engender very different emotional reactions. Many intermarried couples say: "We're going to let our children choose their own religion. That way they'll get the best of both worlds." But the reality is that children of intermarried couples suffer an identity crisis.

One set of grandparents has a Christmas Tree, the other a Chanukah menorah.

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A film like "The Passion" provides an opportunity to raise these issues.

They will probably have highly diverse reactions to the film, and the anti-Semitism elements will be very difficult for them to reconcile.

I made our children aware of their culture and heritage.

Our son was bar mitzvahed and attended Hebrew school for five years.

He finally agreed to the Bris, but said, 'I'm sure you'll understand when I take the baby to be baptized.' I was shocked.

Now I'm not sure our marriage is going to survive." The video shows these couples – none of them religious – describing how the major obstacle in their marriage is the issue of Jesus.(The fact is that 92 percent of children of intermarriage marry non-Jews, effectively detaching themselves forever from the Jewish people.That's simply the default choice in our predominantly non-Jewish society.) But imagine if the child becomes a committed Jew or Christian. If he becomes a believing Christian, he'll think the Jewish parent is going to hell for denying the faith!Psychologists report that many "dual-religion" children express a great deal of anger at their parents for putting them in the middle of an issue that the parents themselves could not resolve.When a person has to choose one religion over the other, there is always the unconscious sense of choosing one parent over another.Most of the Jewish people I know well don’t consider themselves religious at all. However, most of the Jewish people I know are also somewhat observant Jews, which means that they go to Temple on some of the Jewish Holy days, and sometimes observe the Sabbath ritual, not because of the religious significance for them, but because it’s a cultural tradition that they cherish.